Week of November 20th, 2017

Fortune Cookie

You notice that the numbers under fortune cookies are code for a message, and they are trying to warn people of something

He was a specialist in secret messages. He was hired by the cartel to make communication secure, really secure. His boss was constantly monitored by the authorities — they knew that he was the leader of the cartel responsible for an estimated 300 deaths each year, they just couldn’t prove it.

Which is why he was hired. Information needed to come in and out very securely, with no issues. There was no problem getting information in — the boss had a very secure connection that was unmonitored, the problem was communicating how to get to the information itself.

He had to make a way to get a string in that could direct him to the correct place.

He decided to use fortune cookies.

Nobody expected fortune cookies, they’re fake, they’re meaningless, they’re harmless. He decided to use the “lucky numbers” that come on the other side of the fortune.

His assistant would explain in cryptic terms how to use the numbers.

Quickly, he created a function to scramble the numbers.

#include <iostream>
int decodeNumber (luckyNumbersArray, start) {
int temporaryNumber
temporaryNumber *= luckyNumbersArray[((start+1)%6)]
temporaryNumber *= luckyNumbersArray[((start+2)%6)]
 }
return temporaryNumber;
}
int main() {
int luckyNumbers [6] = {12, 9, 24, 43, 16, 32};
int decodedNumbers [6];
for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
decodedNumbers[i] = decodeNumber(luckyNumbers, i);
decodedNumbers[i] = decodedNumbers[i]%47;
}
for (int i = 0; i < 5; i ++ ) {
cout << decodedNumbers[i];
}
}

Simple, yet not something someone could crack

The numbers would then be lined up in order and hashed, and that hash would be used as a .com domain, and would be so random that nobody would be able to guess it.

He decided to test his code, he cracked open a cookie and wrote down the numbers:

2 29 18 29 8 31 

He ran the code on them and got:

10 4 40 1 26 12

Which matched his hand calculations. He then hashed the string without spaces and got:

29bfac9baae0de7dd0836c0ba8152f45a299bcf2d3a90d97f2de8cd382edb84e

For the hell of it he copied and pasted the hash into his browser and added “.com” to the end of it and he ended up on a webpage.

He… ended up on a web page.

That wasn’t supposed to happen.

The page said “WARNING!!! Person behind you!!!”

He turned around and saw a figure weilding a gun at him.

He grabbed for the revolver he put behind his monitor, but it was too late. The figure fired a bullet, hitting right between his eyes, and coming out the back.

He fell on his desk, dead within seconds.

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