#ASKTHEINDUSTRY 06: I want to learn Web Performance: where do I start?

One day I decided I was ready to become a UI designer. I don’t know why I woke up with that intention that morning, but — aside from the fact that it was so not going to happen — I learned a crucial thing about learning that day.

I set off and started looking out for experts in the field and what they were suggesting to beginners kind of blew me away. All influencers in the graphic design field agree on one thing: start by copying others’ work.

Start by copying others’ work.

Depending on whether you’re familiar with the ”everything’s a remix” video series or not, you may already know this. Creativity stems from copying, transforming and combining what has already been created by other people.

That sounds great, but what has all of this to do with learning Web Development the performance way? Here it comes.

Since that day I started questioning my approach to learning new topics: having an engineering background, I usually start with documentation/books/papers/wikipedia. I try to learn by absorbing notions. Now I changed the way I approach new topics, especially when it’s about development. Now I start by copying what others do.

I changed the way I approach new topics, especially when it’s about development. Now I start by copying what others do.

If you want to approach Web Performance, or Web Development in general, and don’t know where to start, the best piece of advice I can give to you is this: head over to GitHub and mimic what other people in the field do. See how they implement costly animations. Try to replicate a design and see if you can hit the same First Paint. Shamelessly copy and paste other devs’ code, then steal the ideas you can find in those snippets.

Do this all over again. It will astonish you how quickly you’ll start to catch up on new topics and techniques.


This pieces is part of the #ASKTHEINDUSTRY project, a series of daily conversations with the Web Dev industry. You ask, I’ll answer, or find someone who can.

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