Does Everybody Have ADHD?

Rising rates of the condition signal real problems with our world

John Kruse MD, PhD
Wise & Well

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Ketut Subiyanto / Pexels

As of 2022, 11.4% of US kids between the ages of 3 and 17 have been diagnosed with ADHD, a new study concludes. This reflects a substantial increase — one million more children than had been found diagnosed with ADHD in 2016.

Are we really facing an epidemic of ADHD? If so, why?

Some dismiss the rising case numbers as a plot to drug more kids, or an example of modern culture coddling inappropriate behavior. Modern psychiatry, pharmaceutical companies, corporate culture, and our insurance-driven healthcare system have problems, but we ignore rising rates of ADHD at our peril.

Rather than being a red herring, increased rates of ADHD diagnoses serve as a canary in the coal mine. Changes to our society are imperiling the brains and daily functioning of not just our children, but of adults as well.

Is this real?

The current study, published last week in the Journal of Clinical Child & Adolescent Psychology, compared childhood rates of ADHD to previous data using the same populations and survey tools as the previous analysis, thereby avoiding the error of making false comparisons when different methods are used to assess a condition. The researchers relied on…

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John Kruse MD, PhD
Wise & Well

Psychiatrist, neuroscientist, father of twins, marathon runner, in Hawaii. 100+ ADHD & mental health videos https://www.youtube.com/@dr.johnkruse6708