Woken Digital
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Woken Digital

5 ways to Fluently Speak Your Customers’ Language

There is a big difference between talking and communicating. Communication is a two-way thing. Someone on the other end must be listening.

Talking, however, doesn’t have to be both ways. You can talk to yourself or no one in particular.

Communication is key in business. However, many businesses only talk, they don’t communicate, not to talk of communicating fluently.

To communicate fluently, you have to speak the language of your customers.

Language, here, does not mean the national or native language or dialect, it doesn’t even mean technical jargon. It means speaking to your customers’ needs or desires.

Speaking fluently to a need

Every customer has a need or desire. It is innately not material, it is only expressed through material things.

People want to be respected, admired, desired, appreciated and loved. They only need that thing they buy from you to satisfy that need.

I was recently in the wristwatch business. And what they say is true, a $60 Rolex watch and a $500 Rolex watch are both fakes. Original Rolex wristwatches will cost you nothing short of $6500.

So, why do people shell as much as $500 on a fake wristwatch? Validation.

Except you’re a celebrity, there’s hardly anyone that would come around to check if your watch is original or fake. Most of the people that see you with that wristwatch would think you’ve got the original one.

You can’t convince them to like what they don’t find attractive.

Emotions are fickle. People either like something at a glance or they don’t. No matter how well-written your copywriting is, the picture does 50% of your selling.

The remaining 50% is what you achieve by converting features into benefits.

So, if you’re a dental clinic, people may get scared about cavity or gum disease, but they can easily picture a beautiful smile with sparkling white teeth. So, what do you sell? You sell a pain-free beautiful smile.

You’ve got to understand that people make on-the-spot decisions with their emotions. If they see a beautiful watch ad, they want it at that moment. They’re already imagining how it feels on their wrist when they’re attending that party.

However, a beautiful watch with a mediocre picture will burn your ad spend faster than it takes paper to burn in naked fire.

It is the same with every business. It’s hard to convince people to buy what they don’t find attractive.

Give them a safety net.

This is how you make them an offer they can’t refuse. Why? Because you’ve made them think they’ve got nothing to lose.

In the wristwatch business, we tell customers “ if your watch stops working at any time within 2 years, we’ll give you a new one or your money back.” Return rates are usually below 10%. Does this mean that just 10% of wristwatches stop working within 2 years? I doubt it.

This is why: we sell top-quality wristwatches, but customer usage varies. However, most people don’t remember the guarantee after a month of enjoying the product.

At Woken Digital, we gladly give our clients a limitless number of rewrites. However, rewrites happen less than 20% of the time.

Be where they are.

If you’re targeting small businesses that sell products or services, then your clients are many on Instagram. You should expand your influence there. You should run local ads, use hashtags, and find ways to make them aware of your presence.

If your clients are professionals, then get on LinkedIn and start connecting.

For you to communicate, you’ve got to find a person to communicate with first. It’s a no-brainer.

However, don’t be afraid to try out things. I once saw a Nigerian fashion designer get an international supply contract when he uploaded some of his beautiful products on LinkedIn. The buyers loved what they saw and wanted the products right away.

Listen

As I mentioned earlier, communication is a two-way thing. You get the chance to talk, then you listen to what the other person is saying, and, then, you talk again. Then, you listen again.

Go on Twitter and listen to the dissatisfaction of people who patronized businesses in your niche. Go to the Amazon review sections of products in your niche. Head to the Instagram comments of sellers in your niche. You don’t have to wait till they tell you what they don’t want. You’ve got to go out there and learn it.

And when you learn about all these pain points, you find ways to solve those problems for your business, and then make the solutions to those pain points your selling points. If sellers in your niche deliver late, super-fast delivery should be your pitch.

Speaking fluently for business growth.

Fluency commands attention. And attention is a scarce commodity on the internet these days. You’ve got to put in more effort to get it. And that’s why you’ve got to speak in the way they will understand. And do it fluently.

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Woken Digital helps you create content that speaks to your prospect’s needs. Blogs, expert articles, social media posts, emails, newsletters, and lead magnets.

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John Ajayi

John Ajayi

Walking through this adventure called life. Am I the only one who thinks this way or life is just like Jumanji without dinosaurs?

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