A Focus on Women Who Inspire Us at Next Century

Every year Next Century Corporation runs a day to promote women in computing that is focused on girls aged 8–14 years old. In this first newsletter we discuss women who inspire us. Follow us on Facebook for more details about our upcoming events.


Women in Computing Then and Now

These are some amazing women that inspire us at Next Century. We hope that they can inspire you as well.

Below is more information about each with links to more details.

1928, Jean E. Sammet

Photo curtesy of Mount Holyoke College

The 1st woman to be awarded a Ph.D. in computer science in 1968. While working for IBM she developed the FORMAC programming language — the 1st widely used computer language. Find more information about her here.


1951, Radia Perlman

Photo curtesy of Atlantic.

Known as the “Mother of the Internet” for inventing the spanning-tree protocol. She also actively teaches young children computer programming. Read more about Radia in an Atlantic article here.


1955, Carol Shaw

Image from Vintage Computing & Gaming

Carol is said to be the 1st female video game designer. She created a number of popular games such as 3-D Tic-Tac-Toe, Super Breakout, River Raid, and Happy Trails. Find out more about her in a Medium post here. (The Rosie Riveters blog has many amazing women on it!)


1982, Kathryn Parsons

Image from EliteBuisness

She founded Decoded — a company to help people became digitally literate. Decoded’s signature is a one day course that claims to train participants without any background to code in day. Here is a great article from EveningStandard on balance.


1988, Heather Payne

Image from 99u.com

The founder of Ladies Learning Code and HackerYou Heather’s goal is to make learning code more accessible to women and girls everywhere. You can watch a video of mission from 99U on how she made her ideas happen.

Who would you add to this list? Let us know.


Contributors:

MaryLynn Reed is a Junior User Experience Engineer at Next Century Corporation.

Laurian Vega is a Senior User Experience Engineer at Next Century Corporation, a volunteer with Systers and the Anita Borg Institute, and a mom of three human-shaped boy monsters.

All content in this post is the intellectual property of Next Century Corporation. Please contact WIC@NextCentury.com if you have any questions. If you are interested in learning more about Next Century, please check our website below:

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