What To Do When You Can Say #MeToo: A Guide to Discussing Sexual Harassment/Assault (Part 1)

What To Do When You Can Say #MeToo: A Guide to Discussing Sexual Harassment/Assault (Part 1) — read Part 2 here

By Jessica Sobhraj (Jessica@womeninmusic.org) (last updated 5/29/18)

This is the first in a three-part series by Women in Music about sexual harassment and assault. The first part provides practical resources, tips, and clear action steps that you can take now if you are experiencing sexual harassment or assault. The second part of this series addresses the relevant mental-health related issues. Finally, the third installment will feature trained therapists and HR executives that will host an online event open to the public that will examine real experiences. — your stories.To share your story anonymously for potential inclusion in the event, please email us atMyStory@womeninmusic.org.

If you’ve been following the #MeToo movement, you are aware that sexual harassment and assault are horrific realities that virtually every woman faces. If you are a woman, you may have known this all along, from your and your friends’ personal experiences. Statistically speaking, 1 in 3 women have experienced sexual harassment at work and 71% of incidents go unreported. Every 98 seconds, another person experiences sexual assault.

Women in Music represents over 4000 women across 12 chapters and has hosted discussions on this and many other issues we face worldwide. What we’ve learned is that there is no one-size-fits-all approach to handling sexual harassment or assault. Each woman has her own unique set of circumstances and level of comfort when discussing her unique experiences. As a community, it is our duty to support each other however best we can. Whether you work in a company, operate on your own, or are a bystander, we hope that you will find something helpful here.

What Is It?

Sexual harassment and assault can take many forms. Here are just a few examples:

What You Can Do:

As a general rule of thumb, if you feel uncomfortable, whatever behavior is causing that feeling is probablynot ok. Here are a few suggestions of things you can do right away:

If you are experiencing it:

Call out the behavior.

Document everything:

Know your state or region’s policies:

Speak to someone:

File a complaint:

If you have witnessed it:

If you see it happening, take a stand:

Respect the victim’s comfort level:

If you are an employer or work in human resources:

This is the first part in our ongoing series on this topic that we will continuously build on. You can read Part 2 here. If you have questions, comments, or other resources you would like to see listed here, please reach out to us!

Women in Music

Established in 1985, Women in Music Organization’s mission is to advance the awareness, equality, diversity, heritage, opportunity and cultural aspects of women in the musical arts and industry through education, support, empowerment and recognition.

Jessica Sobhraj

Written by

Women in Music

Established in 1985, Women in Music Organization’s mission is to advance the awareness, equality, diversity, heritage, opportunity and cultural aspects of women in the musical arts and industry through education, support, empowerment and recognition.