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Letter sent on Jun 22, 2017

The News

June 23, 2017

It’s finally Friday! Yesterday, the Republicans released the Senate version of their bill repealing the Affordable Care Act, which prompted a firm rebuke from former President Barack Obama.

In other news, federal officials lifted endangered species protections for grizzly bears at Yellowstone National Park; President Trump denied having taped recordings of his conversations for fired FBI Director James Comey; and four Arab countries feuding with Qatar outlined a list of demands for reconciling with the boycotted Arab nation.

Anyway, thanks for reading the newsletter and if you still haven’t yet done so, check out our article on the overlap in Los Angeles’ traffic and social schedules.

Have a great week.

Cheers,

The Wonks Team


Politics and Public Policy

  • FiveThirtyEight assesses which four Republican senators from opposite ends of the GOP spectrum could prove most pivotal in the health care debate and would have procedural veto power in preventing the health care bill’s passage in the Senate.

Business, Science, and Health

  • NPR writes about the nature of dreams and how new research on the subject rejects the Freudian theories of dreams as unconscious desires but more as more mundane mental activities where people replay their actions from the day that just passed.
  • The Atlantic writes about the shapes of bird eggs, noting that few eggs actually have the elliptical “egg shape” of chicken eggs and the relationship between a bird’s ability to fly to the symmetrical shape of its eggs.

Sports and Culture

  • Shaun Scott reflects at Quartz on the value of culture criticism in response to the growing number of politically-oriented reviews and analyses of pop culture, citing the lack of corresponding civic engagement to address the problems conveyed in media.
  • The Washington Post profiles the decline of the electrical guitar, remarking on the absence of popular songs driven by guitars and how the fewer teenagers have interest in learning how to play the instrument.
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