The inevitable decline of RSS

Jake Spurlock
Mar 29, 2013 · 1 min read

With great sadness I write about the inevitable decline of RSS. Snuck into a generic press release about “spring cleaning” Google decided to kill of a product that lives near and dear to my heart, Reader. It shouldn’t have come as such a surprise, the writing was on the wall.

When Google launched Google+, they suddenly had competing platforms, between Reader and G+. Both were built for consumption, in the sharing of links and content. After Google decided to dog food the platform, that meant killing competing services. I have lots of friends and family members that loose themselves in Google Reader but wouldn’t touch G+ with a ten foot pole.

When there is a disruption like this, only innovation can follow. There have been big updates from Feed.ly, Reeder, and more. Yet others like MG Siegler, and Marco Arment are worried that the large numbers that came from RSS subscribers might be leaving. As a web producer for a magazine with a large number of RSS subscribers, we can’t help but be worried. Is it RSS, and news reading apps that will fill the void, or is it something else? Reddit? Flipboard?

Only time will tell.


For fun, check out the Google Graveyard, curated by Slate.

WordPress. The thick of it.

WP_Query and more…

    Jake Spurlock

    Written by

    Geek, designer, HTML+CSS lover. Taker of photos, and sometimes skiing and biking... Software Engineer @WIRED

    WordPress. The thick of it.

    WP_Query and more…

    Welcome to a place where words matter. On Medium, smart voices and original ideas take center stage - with no ads in sight. Watch
    Follow all the topics you care about, and we’ll deliver the best stories for you to your homepage and inbox. Explore
    Get unlimited access to the best stories on Medium — and support writers while you’re at it. Just $5/month. Upgrade