Image for post
Image for post

Evaluation and user experience of a financial trading platform

While it is easy to measure the financial performance of a service, the quality of its user experience is intangible and is what drives success.

We worked as New York based collaborator with Livework studio to support J.P. Morgan in measuring the service outcomes of their trading platform, to improve the onboarding experience and work processes of traders (users), the bank (business), and the bank’s financial advisor that run the service (operations).

A service outcome is the task or result that the service accomplishes for stakeholders, it can be broken down to outcomes for each stage of the user experience.

In an hypothetical example,a possible outcome for a pre-transaction phase of trading platform service would be ‘the trader views in real time what financial products are launched on the market’.

Research
We interviewed digital and business analysts to create a blueprint of the current state. By including three distinct service swim lanes in the blueprint for the three outcome types — user, business and operations. This structure of the Blueprint illustrates the work model behind the trading platform, including how outcomes and signals can be observed at any stage.

Image for post
Image for post

Building the metrics through a Temporary Environment

We adopted a metric design framework by Livework, that maps Outcomes, Signals, and Metrics

Signal: indicators of a successful service interaction. (Eg. ‘traders use phone calls to enquire on new financial product launched on the market’)

Metrics: numbers of percentages that can measure the accomplishment of the outcome, using the signal. (Eg. ‘Number of inquires per day’)

Image for post
Image for post

Signal and Metrics are annotated on each outcome swim lane on the Service Blueprint. To create and start using the metrics, we operationalized this framework working directly with JPM service and digital team, following this process:

Image for post
Image for post

For a period of time we tested 12 drafted metrics (4 for each service outcome category) by presenting them to traders and data analysts and asking if those ways of measuring outcomes were valuable to inform their decisions and better evaluate their work and the quality of the service.

Image for post
Image for post

Scale through the Path to Data
The last step to activate the use of the metrics was to understand how to source the data, and what new touchpoints should be designed for the data to flow from the traders interactions to the service team. For this step we created the Path to Data tool that is a chart that includes information about each data stream like where to find the data, how to extract them, who manages them and what they can indicate in the context of the service.

Image for post
Image for post

Based on the insights from validation, the blueprint was modified to include these touchpoints that would allow to track data and qualitative information while using the platform.

We visualized them into a future state high level UX story to hand over for the implementation phase and the automation of the metric tracking.

Outcomes
Future state user experience geared on relevant user, operational, business needs.
— Applied metric framework (included research and validation techniques) ready to be applied to other services within the bank.

Reflections
Service metrics are not ‘objectives’, nor solely based on efficiency, they are affected by underlying values that the service providers want to embed in the service interactions. (eg. Speed of delivery should be a metric if the provider values the time of its users).
— Measuring a service is the result of a human centered research process, to uncover information and facts that motivates service providers to change behaviors or work processes. (eg. If resources are allocated to measure speed of delivery, under acceptable delivery times the providers should be prepared to change back office processes to speed it up).

Work Design Portfolio

An emergent practice to design future work environments, curated by Studio Wé.

Antonio Cesare Iadarola

Written by

Co-design consultant | Design PhD | Narrative Environments. Notes on coworking, service design, facilitation, design education | Studio-we.com

Work Design Portfolio

This is Studio Wé’s archive on Work Design, curated to showcase projects, methos and critical reflections to design new ways of working and happy work environments.

Antonio Cesare Iadarola

Written by

Co-design consultant | Design PhD | Narrative Environments. Notes on coworking, service design, facilitation, design education | Studio-we.com

Work Design Portfolio

This is Studio Wé’s archive on Work Design, curated to showcase projects, methos and critical reflections to design new ways of working and happy work environments.

Medium is an open platform where 170 million readers come to find insightful and dynamic thinking. Here, expert and undiscovered voices alike dive into the heart of any topic and bring new ideas to the surface. Learn more

Follow the writers, publications, and topics that matter to you, and you’ll see them on your homepage and in your inbox. Explore

If you have a story to tell, knowledge to share, or a perspective to offer — welcome home. It’s easy and free to post your thinking on any topic. Write on Medium

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store