Which is Better — a Freelance Writing Website or a Portfolio?

Should Freelance Writers Pick One, the Other, or Use Both?

Which is Better — a Freelance Writing Website or a Portfolio? by Jenn Greenleaf

In a previous article, I talked about whether or not freelance writers need a website. Today, I’m going to cover which one is better — a website or a portfolio? Should writers choose one, the other, or implement a combination of the two?

What Do I Do?

Some writers have a do as I say and not as I do approach to giving advice. I’ve come across many of those when seeking help over the years. I don’t work that way when working with new writers. Instead, I like to share my experiences. When I was learning the ropes, I learned a lot more from writers when I could see what they were doing, as well as when they were honest with me.

I use a combination of the two. I have portfolios EVERYWHERE because I want potential clients to find me no matter what platform they choose to use: (These are just some of them.)

· nDash
· Clearvoice
· LinkedIn
· eByline
· Skyword

Then, I have a small portfolio on my website — Jenn Greenleaf’s Freelance Writing Portfolio. The sad thing about this particular portfolio is it’s the one I like the least. It should be my favorite because it is, after all, on my website. So, I need to fix that immediately.

Read more here about using your LinkedIn Portfolio to its fullest potential:

What Do the Experts Suggest?

One of my favorite websites for finding work, as well as resources, is Freelance Writing Jobs. So, I went here to find out what they had to say about whether or not writers should set up a website. Here’s my favorite takeaway from the article I found, “Your website is your identity, your home base, giving you a professional and authoritative presence where you can be found. Not having a website is akin to having a real-world business without a physical office, and it hurts your credibility.”

Another website I respect is FundsforWriters. C Hope Clark is highly selective regarding the writers she selects, as well as the work she posts on this site. So, when I found this article, Five Tips to Promote Yourself as a Newbie Freelance Writer, by Abhishek Talreja, I was delighted. Why? The first two tips are to create a portfolio and develop a website.

Read more here about what it means to have a lifestyle blog:

I’m Not Claiming to be an Expert

I’ve been in the freelance writing business since 1999. So, I’ve seen and tried a lot of different things. Some of the things I’ve tried have worked, and some haven’t. I’ve taken some good advice, and I’ve followed some terrible advice. You’re going to do the same. That’s part of the learning curve. The operative word here is learning. We’re all here to work together, learn from each other, and do better.

That’s why I’m transparent about my need to work on the portfolio on my business website. It’s a starting point, and I know I need to do better. So, why not be open about that with new writers?

What are my plans?

1. Get rid of the pictures of the large slideshow pictures — they take up too much space and have zero purposes. (Those were part of the original template, and I never removed them.)

2. Include links to all of the most current portfolios I have everywhere as I did in this post.

3. Each time I update my blog with a new clip, add that link to this portfolio page as well.

4. Add .pdf files where links are no longer available.

Read more here about why it’s vital to keep your freelance writing portfolios up-to-date:

I hope you find this information useful as you start your freelance writing journey. You’re going to face a lot of challenges and obstacles along the way. However, it’s critical you remember every problem has a solution. No matter how many times you feel you’re hitting a brick wall, you’ll find a sludge hammer and burst through.


Jenn Greenleaf

Jenn Greenleaf is a freelance writer hailing from the great state of Maine. She launched her career in 1999 and, since then, her specialty has been content writing and SEO. Follow Jenn on Facebook or Twitter, or Working Freelance Writer’s Facebook page.