Challenging dress codes: At school, at work, on the red carpet

Image: REUTERS/Thomas Peter

Saadia Zahidi, Head of Education, Gender and Work and Member of Executive Committee, World Economic Forum Geneva


The new US congress is the most diverse ever — but is it enough? (BBC)

Red carpet dresses at Golden Globes “aren’t a requirement”. (Quartz)

Amnesty International USA co-sponsoring Women’s March on Washington. (New York Magazine)

Less than 20% of STEM workers are women. (Bloomberg)

The gender pay gap is narrowing. Here’s how to close it completely. (The Guardian)

Why do we still make girls wear skirts and dresses as school uniform? (The Conversation)

Ditch your dress code. It’s a symptom of underlying problems of bias. (CIO)

#IWillGoOut: Women to take to the streets against Bengaluru New Year&#rsquo;s Eve mass molestation. (Hindustan Times)

Pakistani province launches app for women to report harassment. (Reuters)

Saudi Arabia shaking up social norms, allows women to get married without approval of male guardians. (Albawaba)

Computers are inheriting gender bias. How do we fix it? And should we?

More work is needed on China’s first domestic violence law. (News Deeply)

The US government is suing Google over its diversity data. (Quartz)

Tech trends to watch in women’s health. (MIT Technology Review)

The gender gap in eastern Europe — a new EBRD survey. (The Financial)

Campaign grows in Lebanon to abolish law enabling rapist to marry victim. (Middle East Eye)

Men who mentor women: women know who they are. (Harvard Business Review)

74 more women on boards in the US

Women experienced a net gain of 74 board seats in US Fortune 1000 companies. 58% of companies increased the total number of board seats to accommodate new women appointees, without replacing men. 8% of Fortune 1000 companies have no women on the board.

Quote of the week

“And I know that we all can change our cultures here in Spain and around the world to honor and respect women and girls, to see them as leaders worthy of an education, capable of achieving their dreams. I know we can do this, because I believe in the power of young women like all of you to truly change the world.”

Michelle Obama,
First Lady of the United States
Remarks by The First Lady at Let Girls Learn Event in Madrid, Spain


Originally published at weforum.org.

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