Female foreign policy, equality day, burkini bans and other must-read gender stories of the week

Image: REUTERS/Stringer

Saadia Zahidi, Head of Education, Gender and Employment Initiatives and Member of Executive Committee, World Economic Forum


Welcome to our weekly digest of stories about how the gender gap plays out around the world — in business, health, education and politics — from the World Economic Forum.

The US celebrates Women’s Equality Day. What is it? (Huffington Post)

More tech companies promise change for Women’s Equality Day. (Wired)

Flexible work schedules benefit men more than women. (World Economic Forum)

These tech companies are offering internships for 40-something women. (Washington Post)

Do women run countries differently from men? The myth of thefemale foreign policy. (The Atlantic)

I created the burkini to give women freedom, not take it away. (The Guardian)

The French burkini bans are irresponsible, Islamophobic, and terrible for women. (Slate)

Gender inequality costs $95 billion in Sub-Saharan Africa: UN Report. (NBC News)

Can parallel ‘women’s government’ advance gender equality in Egypt? (Al-Monitor)

Women CEOs from Europe to dominate trade delegation to UAE. (Bloomberg)

29 companies to join White House initiative on gender pay gap. (Bloomberg)

Judge in Stanford rape case will stop hearing criminal cases. (Reuters)

South Africa’s first black female pilot. (CNN)

What American women who wear Hijab want you to know. (The Atlantic)

Number of women killed by intimate partners and family members, by region (2012, or latest year). United Nations Office of Drugs and Crime Homicide Statistics (2013).

Image: Gender Parity Team, World Economic Forum

“Most of the real foreign-policy effects of having women run countries, if indeed there are any, won’t really be known until more women do it.”
Kathy Gilsinan senior editor at The Atlantic
The myth of ‘female’ foreign policy, August, 2016

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Originally published at www.weforum.org.