Zero Hunger in a changing climate

Giorgia Pergolini
Nov 11, 2017 · 4 min read

As annual climate negotiations take place in Bonn, Germany, between 6 and 17 November 2017, the World Food Programme (WFP) highlights climate change as one of the leading drivers of hunger.

Mozambique. Photo: WFP/Jeronimo Tovela

Every year, the effects of extreme weather events force an estimated 26 million people into poverty. Economic losses due to climate-related disasters now regularly exceed US$100 billion annually, and are projected to double by 2030. It costs WFP an average of US$ 2.3 billion a year — around a third of its annual budget — to respond to climate-related disasters.

With governments gathered in Bonn for the 23rd Conference of the Parties (COP23) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, WFP is calling for increased efforts to be made to strengthen climate preparedness and resilience, particularly in those parts of the globe most at risk. This is essential if a world with Zero Hunger is to be achieved.

Also at COP 23, WFP and the Government of Sweden are launching a compelling new report, How Climate Drives Hunger, as the culmination of years of work under the Climate Adaptation, Management and Innovation Initiative (C-ADAPT), funded by the Government of Sweden. The study provides synthesis and outcomes of food security climate analyses, which assess the impact of climate change on hunger and nutrition, with a particular focus on the world’s most vulnerable nations. The evidence in the study offers governments and partners information that will be invaluable in the areas of both policy and planning.

In 2017, WFP has continued to support preparedness and resilience-building measures in support of communities that have been affected by climate-related disasters. This year alone, WFP has helped more than 9 million food-insecure people affected by hurricanes, drought and floods in the Caribbean, the Horn of Africa and South Asia.

Hurricane Maria in Dominica. Photo: WFP/Giorgia Testolin

WFP is participating in debates and policy discussions at COP23, as well as using its expertise on climate change and the impact of food and nutrition security to advocate for some of the world’s most at-risk communities. WFP is also participating in multiple high-level side events to call attention to the plight of those whose food security is increasingly being undermined by extreme weather events (see calendar below).

WFP booth at COP23, WFP/Giorgia Pergolini

Recent publications detailing the impact of climate change on food security, and showing how WFP is helping vulnerable communities to adapt, prepare and respond to climate shocks, are available at an information booth WFP is sharing with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) and the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD). These include a short fact sheet detailing WFP’s work disaster preparedness and response in 2017.

Stay tuned for more

WFP is tweeting during the two weeks of COP23. Please follow us at @WFP and @WFP_DE.

Side-events calendar

Monday 13 November

18:30–20:00

Climate finance for climate smart land use: Delivering the Paris Agreement

WFP, IFAD, FAO, UNCCD

Tuesday 14 November

10:00–11:15

Innovation and entrepreneurship for transformative climate solutions

UNIDO, WFP

Tuesday 14 November

12:30–14:00

High-level side-event — Marrakech Partnership for Global Climate Action: Addressing Climate Change for a World Free of Hunger, Malnutrition and Poverty — Roundtable 1

Tuesday 14 November

18:30–20:00

Building on the Sendai Framework in support of the Paris Agreement implementation and monitoring UNISDR, WFP, FAO, ILO, ITU, OHCHR, UN WOMEN, UNESCO, UNU, WHO and WMO

Thursday 16 November

10:45–12:45

High-level meeting: Loss and damage and the 2030 agenda: Building strong linkages

UNDESA

Thursday 16 November

12:45–14:30

InsuResilience Global Partnership Forum Working group on ‘Targeting the poor and vulnerable: Direct assistance enabled through flexible social protection

Thursday 16 November

10:45–12:45

High-level meeting: Loss and damage and the 2030 agenda: Building strong linkages

UNDESA

Thursday 16 November

12:45–14:30

InsuResilience Global Partnership Forum Working group on ‘Targeting the poor and vulnerable: Direct assistance enabled

Thursday 16 November
12:45–14:30
InsuResilience Global Partnership Forum Working group on ‘Impact pathways for resilience on the micro level”

Thursday 16 November
14:00–15:30
High-level side-event: Building Smallholders’ Resilience to Climate Change through South-South Cooperation

Friday 17 November
11:15–12:45
Relieving climate-induced migration pressure through crop insurances in Sub-Saharan Africa
Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK)

World Food Programme Insight

Insight by The World Food Programme