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7 Character Types Every Story Needs

character types

When it comes to writing a great story, it is important that you know how to utilize your characters as effectively as possible. Remember that your readers will see your story through your character’s eyes. As a rule, you should make sure you know the types of characters you should use in your story.

Here are 7 character types every story needs.

1. Protagonist

The protagonist is the main character within the story. The events of the story will be seen through the eyes of the main character, and whether or not your readers will like your story, depends on your protagonist.

When you write your protagonist, it is important that you make him or her as well-rounded as possible. As a rule, you should not make your protagonist too perfect, because it will make him or her seem boring. Make sure your protagonist is realistic. Give him or her qualities that are not associated with a protagonist. The protagonist could be jaded, selfish, or neurotic. However, you should also give your protagonist qualities that make him or her likeable. Overall, writing a great main character is a matter of balance. He should have realistic qualities to make him or her relatable and good qualities to make him or her likeable.

2. Antagonist

While the protagonist is the main character of the story, the antagonist is the main point of conflict within the story.

On writing your antagonist, it is important that you stay away from the usual clichés. The antagonist does not have to be the very personification of evil. That would make your antagonist too mainstream, and boring. If you are going to write your antagonist, you should make sure that he or she has unique qualities. These qualities don’t even have to be villainous. They could even be good qualities that have become corrupted in the long run. A great example of an antagonist is Hannibal Lecter. While still a cannibal, there is a subtlety to his personality that makes him likeable.

3. Love interest

The love interest is meant to be the protagonist’s object of desire. This character is meant to give the main character a romantic partner, and something to thrill the audience’s sense of romance as well. When you write the love interest, you should make sure that there is a sense of chemistry between the main character and the love interest. Nothing is more cringe worthy than a forced romance. An incredible love interest is Peeta Mellark from the Hunger Games book series. In physical form and personality, he is the polar opposite to the main character Katniss Everdeen. Yet their romance works, due to their shared experiences together.

4. Deuteragonist

The deuteragonist is the secondary character in the story. While he or she is not as important as the main character, the deuteragonist is still an important character in the story. The deuteragonist is usually the companion and main source of support for the main character. A wonderful example of a deuteragonist is Samwise Gamgee from The Lord of the Rings book series.

5. Confidant

The confidant is not really a main character, however, he or she is still quite important. The confidant is meant to act as a source of support for the main character. He or she is also a great sounding board for the main character’s many challenges. Some great examples of confidant are Alfred in the Batman comics, and Gale from the Hunger Games.

6. Foil

This character type is not really the antagonist in the story. Instead, he or she is meant to be the polar opposite of the main character. The foil is meant to highlight key aspects of the main character’s personality. A great example of a foil character is Banquo in the Macbeth play. Like Macbeth, Banquo wants his heirs to rule the kingdom, however, he does not stoop to murder in order to gain this wish. This further highlights Macbeth’s power hungry nature.

7. Tertiary character

While the background character is not as important as the main character, he or she is still a useful part of the story. The background character could act as an assistant or a helper during some parts of the story. However, they are never really heavily linked to the main storyline.

Conclusion

If you are going to write a truly great story, it is important that you know about the kinds of characters that you could use in your story. With these tips, you’ll be able to write characters in the best way possible.

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Character Archetypes that Every Writer Should Be Aware Of

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Flynn Hannan

Flynn Hannan

Bibliophile , Senior Indie Editor at Writers Republic