Five Questions
with Paul Sturgess

Paul Sturgess @paulsturgess


Talk: Building Title Challenge — From Idea to App Store

Paul has worked as a Ruby on Rails developer for 8 years. Recently turning his hand to RubyMotion, to build the iOS football manager game Title Challenge. He blogs about RubyMotion development at paulsturgess.co.uk.

Why did you agree to speak at WXG?

I’ve enjoyed attending the WXG in the past, so it’s good to be able to help out on the other side of things.

Building Title Challenge was a big learning curve and experience with a brand new technology (RubyMotion) so I feel as though I’ve got something interesting to talk about and share.

What do you think attendees will get out of your talk?

My primary intention is to inspire. Before I built Title Challenge my programming experience was primarily with building websites — I hadn’t built a game or mobile application before.

I’ll be sharing my experiences using RubyMotion, discuss the development process and give an insight into some of the major challenges we faced.

How did you get into your field?

At university I studied a Business IT degree that contained some programming and e-commerce modules that captured my interest. After graduating I absorbed myself in learning how to build website front-ends using only CSS (cutting edge at the time).

Version 1 of Ruby on Rails coincided with my growing desire to learn back-end programming and it seemed like a natural fit. I’ve been programming in Ruby ever since and now have no-idea how to build website front-ends!

Who is your inspiration in the industry?

Whenever Sandi Metz (@sandimetz)or Avdi Grimm (@avdi) have something to say I will try and take note. I think Sandi’s POODR book is the best programming guide I’ve ever read. It really opened my eyes to how clean and concise object-oriented code could/should be written.

What advice would you give to someone new to the industry?

Don’t be afraid to ask simple questions and embrace the fact your knowledge will become outdated. This is what keeps it exciting.

When I first started out, I remember being overwhelmed with information and thinking there was no way I’d remember it all. Slowly over time I realised that actually no-one in the industry knows everything.

However, this is the best part, the web development industry is full of loads and loads of really helpful people, all willing to share their knowledge and help each other out.

In short, stackoverflow.com is your new best friend.

Paul Sturgess will be speaking at WXG on Friday 25th September.

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