The pandemic has triggered a wave of reflections about how hard it is to stay at home, but many of us have been doing it for years.

Photo of a white woman with long brown hair lying in bed reading a book. There is dappled sunlight shining on her and the bed
Photo by Annie Spratt on Unsplash


Lots of people are disabled but undiagnosed, so why don’t we hear many stories about that experience?

photo of an asphalt road with bare trees on either side disappearing into grey fog.
Photo by Wes Hicks on Unsplash


Friendship changes when you get sick, and it hurts.

photo of four people standing with their arms around each other’s shoulders, looking away from the camera at rolling hills.
Photo by Helena Lopes on Unsplash


When you’re chronically ill or dynamically disabled, it feels like your whole life is about trying to get better

Photo: Roco Julie/Flickr


When you are chronically ill or dynamically disabled, you must constantly let go of the person you used to be.

Dim photo of many lit tea lights receding into a black background.
Photo by Mike Labrum on Unsplash


For people living with chronic illness and dynamic disability, rest is part of the solution not the problem.

photo of a chihuahua’s head peaking out from a pile of blankets.
Photo by Vlad Tchompalov on Unsplash


Maybe the media has led you to believe that all disabilities are visible and static. Disabilities caused by chronic illness can be anything but.

photo of a woman walking away from the camera down a cobblestone city street.
Photo by Clayton Fidelis on Unsplash


There comes a point when building your best life is more important than chasing the wellness you’ve lost.

Silhouette of a person holding their arms out wide and letting what appears to be sand fall through their fingers.
Photo by Mazhar Zandsalimi on Unsplash


For one weekend, I forgot about my strict self-care regimen and became a person I’d nearly forgotten about. It felt wonderful.

Photo of a woman in a pink dress looking over a balcony railing past fairy lights and a chandelier into a formal event.
Photo by Alasdair Elmes on Unsplash


It’s a process, not an event

A doctor talking to the patient about their diagnosis.
Photo: wutwhanfoto/iStock/Getty Images Plus

Brianne Benness

Host of No End In Sight, a podcast about life with chronic illness. Co-founder (& former co-producer) of Stories We Don’t Tell in Toronto. She/Her.

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