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Entrepreneurs are doers. They see problems and take action. Yet success also requires careful reflection. The best startup teams tend to think like scientists as much as daredevils. They take risks, but in methodical ways.

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Photo: Sean Benesh

By Rajshree Agarwal

Most people see problems and complain. Entrepreneurs see opportunity and take action. They are doers, even in the face of opposition. In some ways they are like Evel Knievel, who saw the Snake River Canyon in 1974 and decided to launch himself across in a rocket-powered Skycycle. The highly publicized stunt failed spectacularly when the craft’s parachute deployed prematurely, but Knievel survived and continued his career.

He had grit, passion and determination that sometimes looked like stubbornness. One time, after breaking his pelvis in a failed motorcycle jump over 13 buses, Knievel refused a stretcher and hobbled away. …

Getting to no is often a negotiation. It’s a multi-step process of agreement, rather than flat out acceptance. Here’s what you need to do to have your ‘no’ accepted.

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Photo: Kai Pilger

By Ashira Prossack

Everyone has a lot on their plate these days, and the only way to stay on top of things is to be able to say no. Unfortunately, that tiny two letter word tends to be met with a lot of resistance, causing unnecessary friction and added tension. It doesn’t have to be this way.

Getting to no is often a negotiation. It’s a multi-step process of agreement, rather than flat out acceptance. Here’s what you need to do to have your “no” accepted.

Don’t just say no, explain the reason why.

Simply saying no isn’t effective. Explaining your reasoning will give you a much better chance of having your “no” be well-received and agreed upon. You always want to provide a sound reason, not an excuse, as to why you’re saying no. This helps the other person see things from your point of view and respond more rationally rather than reactively. …

A built-in boundary between “real life” and work serves as a small piece of sanity

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Photo: Maxime Caron

By Jen Jamula

Many professionals are realizing that they took their commutes for granted. Some used to drop kids off at school, then squeeze in a podcast while braving the highway. Others savored an coffee during a phone catch-up with mom, as they walked-ran twelve blocks to work. Now, people are lucky if they brush their teeth before powering up their computers.

Whether people knew it or not, that built-in boundary between “real life” and work served as a small piece of sanity. Giving oneself time to envision the day ahead in the morning, and consolidate learnings at the end of the day, eases the stress of the role-shifting that used to necessarily occur between home and work. …

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