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Photo by Junior Moran on Unsplash

Freedom is the opportunity to live your life as you want to. It is a word that is anti-control-over-others and anti-authoritarian. Unfortunately, it is one of those words that, because it has such powerful and positive connotations, has been redefined by many people over the ages.

In Gorge Orwell’s book “1984” one of the mottos of the “Ministry of Truth” is “Freedom Is Slavery”. The reason behind the Ministry of Truth having this motto was to invoke negative associations with freedom and positive associations with the control enacted by the ministry. …


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As anyone who is somewhat acquainted with my work will know, I’m rather interested in the area of education and particularly its overlap with the topic of parenting. I’m quick to share my thoughts on education and parenting on social platforms, whether they be positive comments or criticisms. There are people who see my criticism as being anti-parent and anti-teacher. I would like to share some of my own background to clarify why I take some of the positions that I do.

I used to be a primary school teacher, and I spent over 5 years teaching in school classrooms. I left teaching at the end of 2016 to travel around Europe. I left for these two reasons. I didn’t like who I was becoming and was no longer convinced that the school system was a good system. I was a generally well-liked teacher. Should you ever happen to come across any of my students, they will probably tell you that I was one of their better teachers. But that certainly does not mean that I was always enjoyable. I found out far too early that being a man and older also meant that I had a very powerful voice. When my usual classroom management did not work, I would resort to shouting. And the thing is, this does “work”. The first few times with a class, those kids stopped in their tracks. I’ve got quite a powerful voice. The children were instantly quiet and started being busy or at least looking like they were busy. But as time went one, these shouts didn’t have the same effect as at first. …


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Many parents and educators spend a lot of time worrying about whether a child is developmentally ready for this, or for that. People either fret about a child learning about something too soon, or they fret that the child is “developmentally behind” because they haven’t reached a particular milestone at a certain age. But is this really something to be worrying about? When is the best time for a child to learn to walk, speak, read, write, or any other number of things?

As a former school teacher, there was always much worry from the school and parents when a child was deemed to be “behind”. They were labelled as such because the child hadn’t reached the official standard for their age. To be “behind” in anything was always taken very seriously and remedial help was quickly assigned to any child who didn’t learn things as fast as the rest. …

About

Justus Frank

Justus has a passionate interest in how humans actually learn. He now seeks conversations regarding learning and personal growth at www.frankeducation.nz

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