TL;DR: Mimblewimble privacy is not “fundamentally flawed”. The described “attack” on Mimblewimble/Grin is a misunderstanding of a known limitation. While the article provides some interesting numbers on network analysis, the results presented do not actually constitute an attack, nor do they back up the sensationalized claims made.

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An article titled “Breaking Mimblewimble’s Privacy Model” has been making the rounds today, in which the author asserts that they have somehow ‘broken’ Mimblewimble and Grin’s privacy model.

The “attack” that the author claims to have made is the well-documented and discussed transaction graph input-output-linkability problem. This is not new to anyone on the Grin team or anyone who has studied the Mimblewimble protocol. Grin acknowledged the ability to link outputs on chain in a Privacy Primer published on its public wiki in November 2018, before mainnet was launched. …


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Grin aims to be a privacy-preserving cryptocurrency that is scalable, lightweight, and fair. In order to be privacy-preserving, the ability to trade in and out of Grin without leaking personal information and data is very important.

GrinSwap aims to deliver such functionality. It’s an open source project that is being written in Rust that makes cross-chain atomic swaps between Grin and Bitcoin, as well as Grin and Ethereum/ERC-20 assets possible.

Implementing some of Andrew Poelstra’s previous research on Scriptless Scripts and Adaptor Signatures, it allows two parties to trade assets without having to trust each other, and without having to rely on an intermediary or third party escrow service. …


Grin transaction proofs, Mining support, Send via file and HTTPS, and more

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Photo by Markus Spiske on Unsplash

A few weeks following our first binary, we’re glad to announce the v1.0.1 release of wallet713. In this version, which probably should have been more aptly named v1.1.0 (we’re still figuring out how to SemVer properly), we have a bunch of new features and functionality. See the binary download page for the detailed release notes, below are some of the highlights:

Grin Transaction Proofs

Transacting via grinbox now allows a sender to generate a proof which confirms that a certain grinbox address was sent a specific amount. Actual verification is done against Grin the blockchain.


Grinbox is now open source with client integration instructions

We’re delighted to announce that the grinbox relay is now open source, published in the GitHub repo. With it, we’re also releasing the first draft of integration documentation, to help exchanges, mining pools, and wallet developers get up and running with sending and receiving payments in Grin via grinbox.

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Photo by Guillaume Bolduc on Unsplash

Anyone is now free to set up their own grinbox relay server to route their transactions and store their transaction data. Good for privacy minded individuals, and businesses who do not want to introduce external dependencies. By default, clients and wallet713 users will default to our relay, @grinbox.io, …


Announcing improvements for privacy, performance, and ease of use.

Grin has launched, congratulations to all the project contributors and to the wider Grin community! Now that we’re on mainnet, the real work begins. We would like to thank all the individual users and businesses who have been trying out transacting with grinbox and wallet713, and for the support you have shown us. We’ve been busy working on making it easy to store, send, and swap Grin and are glad to announce that v1.0.0 of wallet713 is now available and ready to use.

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Photo by SpaceX on Unsplash

What’s new?

  • Grinbox address derivation from wallet seed. All grinbox addresses are now derived from your wallet seed, meaning that you do not need to back up any additional information beyond your mnemonic seed. As long as you have your seed, you can restore your grinbox addresses as well. Each seed supports generating 2³² unique grinbox addresses, and you can choose which one to have active. Floonet grinbox addresses begin with x, mainnet addresses begin with g. …


Invoicing, batching, and cold storage in Grin

We are vault713, we make it easy for businesses and individuals to store, send, and swap Grin. We are strong believers in the right to privacy, open source, and in the potential of Grin.

Our goal is to improve the usability of Grin and strengthen wider protocol adoption by developing products that cater to common use-cases of businesses and individuals. In this first blog post we cover what we have developed so far and some stuff that is coming up.

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Photo by Vladislav Klapin on Unsplash

What’s new in wallet713

wallet713 is an open source Grin wallet implementation written in Rust that makes it easier to send and store Grin securely. It integrates with Grinbox to allow users to have their own public address with which they can securely and anonymously transact with other wallet713 users, even if those are offline. We are also working on implementing Atomic Swaps, which will allow users to securely trade BTC to Grins and vice versa. …


This was first published as a newsletter to the Grin News mailing list. To get these updates delivered to your inbox as soon as they are published, subscribe now.

Scriptless scripts, Testnet 3 branch, Berlin Meetup…

News

Dev

  • Gitter dev meeting was postponed to next week, and will now take place two weeks in a row. …


This was first published as a newsletter to the Grin News mailing list. To get these updates delivered to your inbox as soon as they are published, subscribe now.

Q&A Notes, Web wallet, Dynamic PoW, and Berlin Meetup…

News

Dev

  • In Friday’s update @yeastplume presented the first pass of a Grin web wallet, built with Angular 6 and Bootstrap. Contributions are welcomed! …


Notes from the Q&A session with one of the lead developers of Grin, Tuesday May 22 2018.

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Photo from our first Grin meetup @ Zopa HQ!

A few weeks ago, 35 Grin enthusiasts got together for the first meetup of the Grin London community to catch up face to face over pizzas and drinks. As our inaugural guest, we were proud to welcome Yeastplume, one of the project’s lead developers, who gave a brief overview of the project and answered questions. We had a wide range of participants attending, some flying in all the way from Rome just to attend the session. Here are the notes from the discussion, edited for structure, brevity and clarity. A big thanks to Zopa for hosting us and to Yeastplume for making the time to fly over for this.

Daniel Lehnberg

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