Designing for Inclusion

Marvin
Marvin
Apr 8, 2015 · 5 min read

Part 2: Research

We all have limits to our abilities — physical, social, emotional and cognitive. How can we design to embrace these universal things that make us human, but also create solutions that are highly adaptive to an individual person?

We as designers can help to remove obstacles, enabling people to participate in society no matter their individual challenges. Let’s imagine a future that puts human empathy at their design core!

A good read

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A scenario to focus on

Inclusion, disability and design make up for a huge variety. Therefore we had to narrow down to a manageable spectrum of scenarios before we deepen our research. We feel vision impairments make up for a promising topic, with “shopping for groceries” as our primary scenario.

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Photo by David Shankbone (CC BY 2.0) | flic.kr/p/5gtURW

Taxonomy of a grocery store

How do supermarkets “work”? What are the underlying principles in terms of layout, hierarchy, organisation and product placement? How do customers find their way? How do they know where to find which item?

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Market research

Aside from a general supermarket’s taxonomy: Are there already solutions on the market addressing the problem of grocery shopping for the visually impaired and blind?

White cane

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Photo by zoetnet (CC BY 2.0) | flic.kr/p/7MqywS

iPhone

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Screenshot from a video by TommyEdisonXP | https://youtu.be/c0nvdiRdehw

Be My Eyes App

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Screenshot from www.bemyeyes.org/

Colorsay App

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TapTapSee App

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Screenshots by TapTapSee

The Reading Finger

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Images from www.yankodesign.com/2011/09/02/the-reading-finger/


Appendix

What is this about?

Inclusion is a relevant and up-to-date topic widely debated recently. The WHO revised their definition of disability, shifting it from a fixed attribution to a context sensitive consideration. We as designers can help to remove obstacles, enabling people to participate in society no matter their individual challenges. A human centered design approach with deep research and observation, rapid prototyping and cheaper yet more powerful technology can make quite an impact.

The designer behind the project

This is a project by Philipp Steinacher, Dominic Rödel, Laurids Düllmannand Henrik Hagedorn. We study interface design at the University of Applied Sciences Potsdam.

Read more

The website of Microsoft Research Design Expo 2015 provides in-depth information on the overall project.

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