From Nicki Minaj to Brutalist architecture.

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Waterfall by M. C. Escher.

Monument Valley is one of the most beloved mobile games all time. Inspired by the drawings of M. C. Escher, the core gameplay revolves around solving puzzles by exploring isometric “monuments” filled with impossible geometry and optical illusions.

But as David Fernández Huerta (art director on Monument Valley 2) explains, each of these levels had its own inspiration.


Walt Disney understood one thing better than anyone else—the creative process.

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A sketch of Disneyland’s Sleeping Beauty Castle, 1955.

Love it or hate it, Disneyland is an iconic part of American pop culture. Since its creation in the 1950s (under the direct supervision of Walt Disney) the park has hosted over 700 million visitors and is famous around the world.

These fascinating images show how Disney’s ambitious vision was brought to life by his team of “Imagineers”. The quotes are from Disney himself.


Adobe Live is a streaming video series where top creatives share their process. The show features top designers, illustrators and animators and shows how they create their work in real-time.

But as Oddfellows creative director Chris Kelly explains, the show had a problem — it didn’t have a brand.

“Other than using the Adobe typeface there wasn’t much consistency between the shows. The brand was kind of nebulous.”

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Adobe Live on Youtube.

Oddfellows were tasked with creating a visual identity for the show. Their first challenge was finding a way to represent all of the different creative professions that would be featured as guests.


Warning: this article contains spoilers! Grab Florence from the App Store or Google Play if you want to play it first.

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Florence is a game where two people meet, fall in love and eventually drift apart. The game follows 25 year old Florence Yeoh through her daily routines and her relationship with a cellist called Krish.

The game (which was released on Valentine’s Day) has been critically acclaimed, picking up a coveted Apple Design Award — the second for lead designer Ken Wong whose first success came with Monument Valley.


Frank Chimero is a designer, illustrator, and author based in New York. His clients range from Nike to NPR and his work has been featured in Monocle, The Atlantic, Time, Slate and The New Yorker.

In this article, Frank takes us through his process of designing a poster, from concept to production. This particular poster was created to promote a lecture Frank gave called “The Eye Knows” about how words and pictures work together in design.

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Left: Frank’s workspace. Right: the final poster.

Here Frank talks about how he uses his studio space to get inspired.

“The wall above my desk has all kinds of recent discoveries…


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It’s not every day you design something that 48 million people will scrutinise on live TV. But that’s exactly what Clare Waight Keller did when she took on the career defining project to design Meghan Markle’s wedding dress.


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Susan Kare’s icons and fonts for the original Macintosh were revolutionary. They gave a lifeless computer a warmth and personality that lives on in the modern Mac to this day.

This month Susan Kare was awarded an AIGA medal, putting her in the company of design greats like Paul Rand, Charles and Ray Eames, Milton Glaser and Saul Steinberg.

The AIGA award celebrates a career spent searching for the right amount of simplicity and abstraction. Too much, and the design loses all meaning. Too little and the audience can no longer see themselves in it. …


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This logo was used by Nike from 1971 until it was redesigned in 1978. But did you know that it was designed by Carolyn Davidson (a 28 year old student) for $35?


I have a four year old son. And like most four year olds, he’s a creative genius. One day as I was watching him play with Lego, I finally understood the problem with Evernote.

You see, this is Evernote:

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And these are your notes:


How a generation of designers are selling themselves short.

A young man and an old man decide to build a house, so they set out in search of wood. Deep in the forest, they find a mighty oak, big enough to supply all the wood they need. But no matter how hard they swing, their axes can’t pierce the bark of the tree. Eventually they fall to the ground exhausted.

After a while the young man speaks. “The problem is that the bark of this tree is too strong. We must find a different tree.” He picks up his axe and sets off deeper into the forest.

The old…

Ollie Campbell

Co-founder & CEO at Milanote http://www.milanote.com. On Twitter @oliebol.

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