The Future of Web Design is Hidden in the History of Architecture

  1. They serve as places where other people go.
  2. They’re engineered to do this pragmatic job.
  3. The evolution of technology limits this engineering.
  4. And yet, they’re definitely still art.

I. Neolithic

Simple, limited structures

Stonehenge, c. 3000–2000 BC; W3.org, c. 1992

II. Classical

Order and proportion, with some embellishment

The Parthenon, c. 437 BC.; Yahoo.com, c. 1996.

III. Romanesque

Thicker forms and rounder edges

Maria Laach Abbey, c. 1093; Apple.com c. 2000

IV. Gothic

Ornate and mesmerizing

Reims Cathedral, c. 1211; Maroon5.com, c. 2005

V. Renaissance

Clean, logical, and precise

Villa La Rotonda, c. 1567; Rdio.com, c. 2012

And then we start getting into the future…

VI. Baroque

Twisting all the rules

San Carlo alle Quattro Fontane, c. 1638; TBD, c. 2017

VII. Neoclassical

Harkening back to the past

Panthéon (Paris), c. 1790; TBD, c. 2022

VIII. After that, who knows?

Well, we kinda know. It will likely be some form of Neoromanesque or Neogothic. Something neo. Art continually repeats itself in the form of revivals. But eventually? A new technology and a new world view will arrive that we can’t even imagine today.

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Cofounder at @Goldfinch_fi. Previously Head of Product Analytics at @Coinbase, Head of Data Science at @Medium.

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Mike Sall

Mike Sall

Cofounder at @Goldfinch_fi. Previously Head of Product Analytics at @Coinbase, Head of Data Science at @Medium.