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~Originally written by Robert for the design studio, Vitamin London

As an Art Director, my day-to-day role and overall career swings heavily around the intent of differentiation. …


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~Originally written by Robert for the design studio, Vitamin London

As a studio of creative people — regardless of your role — we at Vitamin want to use our platform of skills for social progression. Watching cultural protests in America from afar, as well as experiencing them around one of our studios in London, the ever growing Black Lives Matter movement is something which we not only believe in but want to support in whatever way we can. …


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~Originally written by Robert for the design studio, Vitamin London

Creativity can change the world; a bold statement and sincere belief which everyone in the Vitamin studios hold. And when we all came back to work after the festive break, the catastrophic wildfires in Australia naturally came up as a topic of conversation. Beside seeing people set up GoFundMe pages for volunteer firefighters and pledge nudes for donations, it quickly got us thinking about how we as creatives could find a way to bring genuine and positive action using design.

Ultimately this self-set brief came down to a balance of exposure and real world result; a simple poster design shared as an Instagram story or social post might get seen by people, but what does it actively drive from there? How does it amount to actually helping the people and environment? To begin we created a set of custom animations fed through Giphy for anyone to search and share on their own Instagram stories, raising highly accessible awareness for the wildlife. Rather proudly they’ve currently had over 290,000 views, although still no measurable contribution to the world. So we went back to thinking about the problem at…


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~Originally written by Robert for the design studio, Vitamin London

As a Londoner there is a common expectation that you’re busy all the time. It’s the capital, an all accepting and always moving city without limits. It’s why we walk so quickly past tourists with our places to be, and explains why every other high-street shop sells coffee. Unfortunately it can also come with the hazard where your hobbies and personal interests get buried behind the line “I haven’t had chance”. Even with my past Circuses (the title we give for our personal development days at work), the tasks I’d undertaken ended up ambitious to the point that a day away from routine became busier than ever — ok, yes. …


Culture and the creative industry are both turbulent landscapes, and, after time, things that once looked great become ineffective or out of place. People grow bored towards design or companies outgrow them. So when it comes to the infamous rebrand, why are they so often met with the same vocal unease as finding a tattoo on your bacon?

The most recent example at the time of writing is Slack, as refreshed by the renowned studio Pentagram. …


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“Is creativity some obscure, esoteric art form? Not on your life. It’s the most practical thing (someone) can employ.”

~ Bill Bernbach, copywriter

Back in the early 2000s a new concept called 'Audience 2.0' became a point of discussion within the media industry. Put simply, with the exciting arrival of home computers the general public was no longer limited to just consuming information, they were able to easily create it — people went rapidly from audiences to auteurs.

This was made available through a range of methods including easy home writing and inkjet printing, creating personal websites, communicating to strangers across the globe online, and even home design. It all seems painfully natural to us now and hard to imagine how you couldn’t do so before, but you have to remember that prior to personal computers we relied more on typewriters, sketching and specialist companies. Even then sharing content was if not via direct calls, then through third party printing, post, word of mouth, and existing circulated media such as newspapers, TV or radio. …


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You may not know her name, but you’ve seen her work. Miley sliding onto stage down her own tongue? …


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“We don’t make mistakes, just have happy little accidents”.

Bob Ross, the internet loved artist and almost spiritual guru, is a person many will know by image if not by name. But this simple and innocent statement from one of his many paint-along videos is the essence of an important message.

As a society the concept of mistakes are drilled in to us from an early age. When you were a child I'm sure you remember a certain freedom to explore, however the older you got the more emphasis there was on process and the more you were generally taught a correct way of doing things and an incorrect way. …


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In the honest and frankly relatable words of Erik Spiekerman, type designer and inspirational speaker extraordinaire:

“I'm obviously a typeomaniac, which is an incurable if not mortal disease. I can't explain it. I just love, I just like looking at type. I just get a total kick out of it: they are my friends. Other people look at bottles of wine or whatever, or, you know, girls' bottoms. I get kicks out of looking at type. It's a little worrying, I admit, but it's a very nerdish thing to do.”

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Photography: Robbie Lawrence

Rewind another ten or so years from this 2007 quote to when I was growing up, and everything in my day to day life was pointed out and opened up for comment. It didn't matter whether it was historic, geographic, natural, scientific, linguistic or creative, it was all a point of conversation. Having a calligrapher father and artistic mother, creativity had an especially big part to play for us. So when it came to noticing interesting examples of it, we were discussing the form, function and character. This is something ingrained into me now and a trait I admire in a lot of extremely talented people. …


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For those of you who might have heard of them or even like their music, I recently saw the Foo Fighters live for the first time. And while that may seem to be an abstract start with vague promise of focusing on the ties between audio to visual creativity, it all comes together with this intimate (albeit to 80,000 people) and impassioned speech from frontman and music legend Dave Grohl:

“Ladies and gentlemen, let me tell you something. Do you know what? My duty in life is to bring love to all you motherfuckers every fucking night, that’s what I’ve got to do. That’s my fucking job. I wake up every morning and I think, I’m going to come out here to eighty thousand people and you know what I’ve got to do? …

About

Robert Lloyd

An art director who wants to do great work, for and with, great people ~ part of design studio Vitamin London

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