“The Impatient List” by Gupta et al.
The Impatient List”, an example of Scrollytelling by Gupta et al.

From Storytelling To Scrollytelling: A Short Introduction and Beyond*

Lorenzo Amabili
Nightingale
Published in
6 min readAug 22, 2019

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Likely you have already heard about (Visual) Storytelling. It is a design concept applied in Journalism, Business, Sport, Medicine, Education, and Science. Its exploration keeps growing thanks to the availability and application of a wide variety of techniques.

Also called Narrative Visualisation, it consists of creating a logical sequence of related (data-driven) visualisations, or visual elements, needed to convey a message to an audience in an engaging and effective way.

In the information explosion era, everybody needs a story, everybody needs a narrative (and quickly!). Even if there is a distinction between story and narrative, it is not always clear and the term story is often used in a broader sense to indicate a sequence of events communicated through story-like elements. When a story is prevalently delivered by using visual representations, it becomes a visual story: more intuitive, engaging and concise; see “A picture is worth a thousand words”.

The Basics

First of all, it is important to be conscious of the various possibilities of creating a visual story. There exist several forms of visual storytelling depending on the genre (e.g., video, data-comics, partitioned poster), visual narrative (e.g., highlighting, transition

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Lorenzo Amabili
Nightingale

Data scientist at Buzzi Spa. Located in Casale Monferrato, Italy. Human. #DataScience #DataVisualization #Research